Devotional


I Will Use Self-Control in Eating

foodBlessed art thou, O land, when . . . thy princes eat in due season, for strength, and not for drunkenness! Eccl. 10:17  

The observance of temperance and regularity in all things has a wonderful power. It will do more than circumstances or natural endowments in promoting that sweetness and serenity of disposition which count so much in smoothing life’s pathway. At the same time the power of self-control thus acquired will be found one of the most valuable equipment for grappling successfully with the stern duties and realities that await every human being.

We urge that the principles of temperance be carried into all the details of home life; . . . that self-denial and self-control should be taught to the children, and enforced upon them, so far as consistent, from babyhood.

Children should be taught that they must not have their own way, but that the will of their parents must guide them. One of the most important lessons in this connection is the control of appetite. They should learn to eat at regular periods and to allow nothing to pass their lips between these stated meals. . . .

 Children reared in this way are much more easily controlled than those who are indulged in eating everything their appetite craves, and at all times. They are usually cheerful, contented, and healthy. Even the most stubborn, passionate, and wayward have become submissive, patient, and possessed of self-control by persistently following up this order of diet, united with a firm but kind management in regard to other matters.

Let every youth in our land, with the possibilities before him of a destiny higher than that of crowned kings, ponder the lesson conveyed in the words of the wise man, “Blessed art thou, O land, when . . . thy princes eat in due season, for strength, and not for drunkenness!”


Love

LoveThe fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, longsuffering, gentleness, goodness, faith, meekness, temperance: against such there is no law. Gal. 5:22, 23

     To all who believe, He is as the tree of life in the Paradise of God. His branches reach to this world, that the blessings which He has purchased for us may be brought within our reach. . . . He has given us a Comforter, the Holy Spirit, which will present to us the precious fruit from the tree of life. From this tree we may pluck and eat, and we may then guide others to it, that they also may eat.

     The man who loves God meditates on the law of God day and night. He is instant in season and out of season. He bears the fruit of a branch vitally connected with the Vine. As he has opportunity, he does good; and everywhere, at all times and in all places, he finds opportunity to work for God. He is one of the Lord’s evergreen trees; and he carries fragrance with him wherever he goes. A wholesome atmosphere surrounds his soul. The beauty of his well-ordered life and godly conversation inspires faith and hope and courage in others. This is Christianity in practice. Seek to be an evergreen tree. Wear the ornament of a meek and quiet spirit, which is in the sight of God of great price. Cherish the grace of love, joy, peace, longsuffering, gentleness. This is the fruit of the Christian tree. Planted by the rivers of water, it always brings forth its fruit in due season.

     If we have the love of Christ in our souls, it will be a natural consequence for us to have all the other graces–joy, peace, longsuffering, gentleness, goodness, faith, meekness, temperance. . . .


Worship God and Be at Peace

worshipAnd all thy children shall be taught of the Lord; and great shall be the peace of thy children. Isa. 54:13  

Your home is a little world of itself. . . . You are the ones who must decide whether your children shall choose the service of God or the service of mammon, eternal life or eternal death. . . .

Like the patriarchs of old, those who profess to love God should erect an altar to Him wherever they pitch their tent. . . . Let the father, as priest of the household, lay upon the altar of God the morning and evening sacrifice, while the wife and children unite in prayer and praise. In such a household Jesus will love to abide.

From every Christian home a holy light should shine forth. Love should be revealed in every act. It should flow out in all home intercourse, showing itself in thoughtful kindness, in gentle, unselfish courtesy. There are homes where this principle is carried out–homes where God is worshiped and truest love reigns. From these homes morning and evening prayer ascends to God as sweet incense, and His mercies and blessings descend upon the suppliants like morning dew.

Let us raise our eyes to the open door of the sanctuary above, where the light of the glory of God shines in the face of Christ, who “is able also to save them to the uttermost that come unto God by Him.” . . .

The soul may ascend nearer heaven on the wings of praise. God is worshiped with song and music in the courts above, and as we express our gratitude, we are approximating to the worship of the heavenly hosts. “Whoso offereth praise glorifieth” God. Let us with reverent joy come before our Creator, with “thanksgiving, and the voice of melody.”